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Chapter 7: Using the Plant Collection – Research, Conservation, Public Engagement, Recreation and Tourism

As multidisciplinary institutions at the interface between people and plants, botanic gardens are prime centres for botanical research and plant conservation.

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3/12/18
Developing Climate-Change Resilience in Conservation Plants

Learn about plants being selected and tested for climate change adaptability in coastal areas for agricultural and conservation purposes in this video, funded by the USDA-Nort

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2/14/18
ENSCONET: Seed Collecting Manual For Wild Species

Global biodiversity, including the diversity of wild plants, is of inestimable ecological, economic, and cultural value.

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1/12/18

 

 
 
Landscape Succession Strategy

Ten years ago the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria embarked on an ambitious project to collect, treat and distribute storm water from the catchment within and around the botanic garden.

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12/19/17
New England Wildflower Society-State of the Plants

For the first time, this peer-reviewed report presents the most up-to-date data on the status of plants on the New England landscape.

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12/12/17
State of the World's Plants 2017

Last year's State of the World’s Plants report focused predominantly on synthesising knowledge of the numbers of different categories of plants: How many vascular plants are currently known to science? How many are threatened with extinction?

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12/12/17
From Idea to Realization: BGCI's Manual on Planning, Developing, and Managing Botanic Gardens
With an awareness of the global multilateral environmental agreements (or ‘MEAs’) that shape many national laws and conservation initiatives, botanic garden managers can develop policies that foster outward-looking part
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11/1/17
Perspectives on the Importance of Preserving Cultivated Germplasm

Heirloom vegetables, heirloom roses… how about heirloom viburnums?

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9/24/16
Assigning Disaster Priorities to Your Collection Summary, 2010

In case of disaster, the more prepared you are for response, the better your collection will fare. In a perfect world, you would save all the plants in the collection. But this is not always possible.

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11/4/15

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