You are here

Featured Resource

Diversity is Magic: Emerging issues in selecting appropriate native plants for ecosystem restoration

Selecting species and seed from appropriate sources to maximize project success faces many challenges, and this presentation will review plant selection for ecosystem diversity for economically and ecologically practical outcomes.

Resource
6/3/20
Applying the Zoo Model to Conservation of Threatened Exceptional Plant Species

Maintaining a living plant collection is the most common method of ex situ conservation for plant

Resource
4/7/20
New Tools for Identifying and Prioritizing Range Shifting Invasive Plants

Join Jenica Allen and Bethany Bradley to learn about new tools for identifying and prioritizing range-shifting invasive plants coming soon to a landscape near you.

Resource
11/25/19
Extending U.S. Biodiversity Collections to Address National Challenges

The U.S. national heritage of approximately one billion biodiversity specimens, once
digitized, can be linked to emerging digital data sources to form an information-rich network

Resource
6/26/19
Resource
2/14/19
Adapting to the Recurring Threat of Wildfire: Botanic Garden Case Studies and Lessons Learned

The below case studies were collected and shared in a September 2018 Newsletter from the Center for Plant Conservation. 

Resource
11/26/18
The history and impact of digitization and digital data mobilization on biodiversity research

The first two decades of the twenty-first century have seen a rapid rise in the mobilization of digital biodiversity data.

Resource
11/26/18
Botanic gardens are an untapped resource for studying the functional ecology of tropical plants

Functional traits are increasingly used to understand the ecology of plants and to predict their responses to global changes. Unfortunately, trait data are unavailable for the majority of plant species.

Resource
11/26/18
Ten-Year Performance of the United States National Elm Trial

Ulmus americana (American elm) was an important urban tree in North America prior to the introduction of the Dutch elm disease pathogen in 1930. Subsequently, urban and community forests were devastated by the loss of large canopies.

Resource
11/16/18
2018 Plant Collections Symposium Session and Speaker Recordings

October 17 Morning Sessions at University of British Columbia:  

Resource
11/13/18

Pages