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Introduction to Access and Benefit-Sharing

Access and benefit-sharing (ABS) refers to the way in which genetic resources
may be accessed, and how the benefits that result from their use are shared
between the people or countries using the resources (users) and the people or

Resource
10/31/18
Sustaining the Future of Plant Breeding: The Critical Role of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System

Plant breeders require genetic diversity to develop cultivars that are productive, nutritious,

Resource
10/22/18
Comparative Biology of Cycad Pollen, Seed and Tissue - A Plant Conservation Perspective

Cycads are the most endangered of plant groups based on IUCN Red List assessments; all are in Appendix I or II of CITES, about 40% are within biodiversity ‘hotspots,’ and the call for action to improve their protection is longstanding.

Resource
10/3/18
Plant Exploration: Protocols for the Present, Concerns for the Future

Plant exploration provides the horticulture industry, public gardens, the scientific community, arboreta - and ultimately the public - with more diverse and hardier germplasm that increases the breadth of plants available for research and landscape use.

Resource
8/17/18
The Protection of Indigenous Peoples’ Seed Rights during Ethnobotanical Research 

Recognition of the importance of biodiversity for global food security and the community food sustainability movement has helped increase awareness of seed rights.

Resource
7/23/18
Priority Actions to Improve Provenance Decision-Making

Selecting the geographic origin—the provenance—of seed is a key decision in restoration. The last decade has seen a vigorous debate on whether to use local or nonlocal seed.

Resource
7/16/18
Species Recovery Manual

It is evident that species recovery is not well understood.

Resource
7/10/18
Optimizing Conservation Strategies for a Threatened Tree Species: In Situ Conservation of White Ash (Fraxinus americana L.) Genetic Diversity through Insecticide Treatment

Forest resources face numerous threats that require costly management. Hence, there is an increasing need for data-informed strategies to guide conservation practices.

Resource
7/5/18
Experimental warming in the field delays phenology and reduces body mass, fat content and survival: Implications for the persistence of a pollinator under climate change

Temperature is universally important for organisms and the thermal environment of a diversity of organisms is changing rapidly because of global climate change.

Resource
7/3/18

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