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Climate Adaptation, Assisted Migration, and Ex Situ Conservation

From the American Public Gardens Association Plant Collections Management Symposium. Wednesday, October 17, 2018 from Vancouver, Canada. Presenter: Sally Aitken, UBC forest geneticist

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10/17/19
The Red List of US Oaks

The Red List of US Oaks report details for the first time the distributions, population trends, and threats facing all 91 native oak species in the U.S.

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10/14/19
Conservation Gap Analysis of Native U.S. Oaks

Oaks are critical to the health and function of forest and shrubland habitats in the United States, but many native oaks are threatened with extinction in the wild.

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7/30/19
The Role of Honey Bees in Natural Areas - A Conversation

Talk 1, Rich Hatfield: 
Honey Bees in the Pollination Networks of Natural Areas? An Overview and Best Management Practices 

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5/3/19
Plants are Cool, Too: #SciComm, media relations, and a botanist on Mars

The Plant Conservation Alliance and the Smithsonian’s Department of Botany welcomed Chris Martine, David Burpee Professor of Plants Genetics & Research and Director of the Manning Herbarium at Bucknell University, to present “Plants are Cool, Too: #

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3/15/19
Conservation of threatened plant species in botanic garden reserves in Brazil

Over the last few decades botanic gardens worldwide have been encouraged to adopt complementary measures for the conservation of plant species from their own

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1/30/19
Bridging the gap between conservation practitioner and remote sensing science

The rapid advancements in remote sensing technology offer a unique opportunity to address the increasing rates of ecosystem degradation and biodiversity loss.

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1/28/19
CPC Best Plant Conservation Practices to Support Species Survival in the Wild

These best practices represent a compilation of previous CPC guidelines with updated

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12/19/18
Genetic Resources of Crop Wild Relatives: A Canadian Perspective

Canada is home to about 5087 species of higher plants of which 25% were introduced to Canada either deliberately or by accident. The richness of botanical species is highest in the southern, more densely settled parts of the country.

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12/18/18

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