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Featured Resource

Lightning Protection for Trees

Thousands of trees are struck by lightning every year. These trees will have varying degrees of damage ranging from complete shattering and destruction of the tree, to a slow lingering death, to virtually no apparent damage at all (Figure 1).

Resource
12/12/19
URBAN TREE CANOPY ASSESSMENT: A Community’s Path to Understanding and Managing the Urban Forest

An Urban Tree Canopy (UTC) assessment, which provides a measure of a community’s tree canopy cover, is important for understanding the extent of a community’s forest or tree resource.

Resource
8/1/19
A consistent species richness–climate relationship for oaks across the Northern Hemisphere

Although the effects of climate on species richness are known, regional processes
may lead to different species richness–climate relationships across continents

Resource
4/23/19
Wood and water: How trees modify wood development to cope with drought

Drought is a recurrent stress to forests, causing periodic forest mortality with enormous economic and environmental costs.

Resource
3/8/19
US Urban Forest Statistics, Values, and Projections

U.S. urban land increased from 2.6% (57.9 million acres) in 2000 to 3.0% (68.0 million acres) in 2010. States with the greatest amount of urban growth were in the South/Southeast (TX, FL, NC, GA and SC).

Resource
3/23/18
A Rapid Urban Site Index for Assessing the Quality of Street Tree Planting Sites

Learn about how to evaluate sites that are ideal for urban tree health and growth and resources and tools on how to better assess these sites. 

Resource
3/16/18
Urban Forests For Urban Futures: How Trees Help Create Better Cities

Check out this exciting webinar that covers which cities around the world are considered "green" and have a significant amount of green spaces and forest cover and what impact that is having on the economy, people, and environment. 

Resource
3/16/18
The Power of Trees

New research shows that trees communicate with one another and share nutrients through their roots! They need each other. In urban areas, trees also help us with health, economic and social benefits. They are part of our culture. We need them.

Resource
2/14/18