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Tree Function in Stormwater Biofilters

This seminar includes an invited presentation by Jon Hathaway, Associate Professor at the University of Tennessee Knoxville titled, “Tree Function in Stormwater Biofilters: The Green in Green Infrastructure” and a panel discussion with Mike Perniel (Min

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2/7/20
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1/22/20
Investigating the Stormwater: Quantity and Quality Impacts of Urban Trees

A community with dense overhead tree canopy may benefit from reduced stormwater runoff volume through interception, transpiration, and infiltration but may also suffer from excess nutrients leached to nearby receiving waters from leaf litter. Bill Selbi

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1/21/20
Soil Management for Urban Trees

The goal of the webinar is to provide an overview of soil management for urban trees. Specific emphasis will be given to soil assessment.

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1/21/20
Why Are Trees Important? Human Health and Economics

An ever-growing, international body of research points to many human health and wellness benefits that result from nearby nature experiences. But what about trees?

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11/25/19
Emerald Ash Borer Update

Nate Siegert, Ph.D., USDA Forest Service, discusses the latest information pertaining to the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) and its continued spread across the urban forests of the U.S. and Canada.

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11/11/19
Bartlett: Mulch Application Guidelines

Mulches provide many benefits for trees and shrubs.

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10/15/19
Vulnerability to climate change of islands worldwide and its impact on the tree of life

Island systems are among the most vulnerable to climate change, which is predicted to induce shifts in temperature, rainfall and/or sea levels.

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10/14/19
Oak decline in the United States

Oak decline is a slow-acting disease complex that involves the interaction of biotic and abiotic factors such as climate, site quality and advancing tree age.

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10/14/19
Breeding and Restoring the Next Generation American Elm

Iconic tree species include those native trees that once dominated the typical American city landscape. The American elm and chestnut are the first two that come to mind, and now ash trees are similarly under significant threat of loss.

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9/26/19

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