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Long-term Impacts & Management of Emerald Ash Borer

The results of 14 years of monitoring ash mortality and forest ecosystems in Ohio and Pennsylvania show how EAB has impacted these landscapes.

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4/20/20
Why do Tree Branches Fail?

We will explore how researchers from ecology, forestry and arboriculture have utilized biomechanics to understand how trees contend with the forces mother nature can throw at them during their long-life span.

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4/20/20
CommuniTree: A Model for Engaging Communities in Tree Planting and Maintenance Projects

Tree planting can help communities achieve many resiliency goals such as cooling heat islands, reducing stormwater floods, and building neighborhood cohesion.

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4/13/20
Soil Management for Community Trees

Tree health and risk is heavily influenced by the health and quality of the soil surrounding it.

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4/8/20
A Call to Action for Ash Tree Conservation and Resistance Breeding

Ash tree species in North America are under mortal threat from the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), now in 35 states and five Canadian provinces.

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3/30/20
Phytoremediation of Soils using Fast-Growing Trees in Vacant Lots and Landfills

Phytoremediation is a green technology that utilizes specialized trees to remediate contaminated soils across the rural to urban continuum.

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3/9/20
Phytoremediation of Soils using Fast-Growing Trees in Vacant Lots and Landfills

Phytoremediation is a green technology that utilizes specialized trees to remediate contaminated soils across the rural to urban continuum.

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2/24/20
Tree Function in Stormwater Biofilters

This seminar includes an invited presentation by Jon Hathaway, Associate Professor at the University of Tennessee Knoxville titled, “Tree Function in Stormwater Biofilters: The Green in Green Infrastructure” and a panel discussion with Mike Perniel (Min

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2/7/20
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1/22/20
Investigating the Stormwater: Quantity and Quality Impacts of Urban Trees

A community with dense overhead tree canopy may benefit from reduced stormwater runoff volume through interception, transpiration, and infiltration but may also suffer from excess nutrients leached to nearby receiving waters from leaf litter. Bill Selbi

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1/21/20

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