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Bartlett: Emerald Ash Borer Identification, Biology and Management

Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) was first discovered in southeastern Michigan in 2002.

Resource
9/9/20
Asian longhorned beetle: A new invasive tree pest in South Carolina

The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, or ALB) is a threat to America's hardwood trees. With no current cure, early identification and eradication are critical to its control. Dr. David Coyle (Clemson University) and Mr.

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8/20/20
Inventory and Design Opportunities for Pollinator Habitat on Working Lands

In this first webinar in a two-part series, planners will learn about inventory tools and whole farm conservation planning approaches to enhance pollinator and other wildlife habitat.

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8/20/20
Integrated Chemical & Biological Control of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid: A Guide

Albert Mayfield, USDA Forest Service entomologist from the Southern Research Station, presents information on Hemlock Woolly Adelgid management using chemical and biological control.

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5/15/20
Exotic Invasive Forest Pests in the Age of COVID-19 and Q&A

Cliff Sadof, Purdue University entomologist, discusses everything from the parallels of insect infestations to COVID-19, to the latest information available on forest and wood pests in North America for this EAB University webinar presentation.

Resource
4/20/20
Long-term Impacts & Management of Emerald Ash Borer

The results of 14 years of monitoring ash mortality and forest ecosystems in Ohio and Pennsylvania show how EAB has impacted these landscapes.

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4/20/20
Laurel wilt biology, monitoring, and management

Laurel wilt is caused by Raffaelea lauricola, a fungal pathogen transmitted by the ambrosia beetle Xyleborus glabratus. Dr.

Resource
4/20/20
A Call to Action for Ash Tree Conservation and Resistance Breeding

Ash tree species in North America are under mortal threat from the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), now in 35 states and five Canadian provinces.

Resource
3/30/20
Crapemyrtle bark scale: biology, monitoring, and management

Crapemyrtle bark scale is a relatively new invasive sucking insect pest, first officially reported on crape myrtles just north of Dallas, TX in 2004. Since then, crapemyrtle bark scale has spread to13 states throughout the southeastern U.S.

Resource
3/25/20
Bartlett: Micronutrient Deficiencies

Six elements are required in small amounts for the growth and development of plants. These are referred to as micronutrients: iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), molybdenum (Mo), and boron (B).

Resource
3/10/20

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