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Featured Resource

The Science and Practice of Managing Forests in Cities

The past few months have highlighted the importance of parks and nature in cities.

Resource
6/30/20
CommuniTree: A Model for Engaging Communities in Tree Planting and Maintenance Projects

Tree planting can help communities achieve many resiliency goals such as cooling heat islands, reducing stormwater floods, and building neighborhood cohesion.

Resource
4/13/20
Crop Science Special Issue: Connecting Agriculture, Public Gardens and Science

North America’s agricultural and natural landscapes are vital to feeding humanity—they are home to many populations of important food plants and their wild relatives.

Resource
11/25/19
Strategic science planning for responsible stewardship and plant protection at the U.S. Department of Agriculture

Agriculture is comprised of managed ecosystems, which can include forests, rangelands
and crops; these managed ecosystems are vital resources, providing a host

Resource
11/15/19
A Road Map for Conservation, Use, and Public Engagement around North America’s Crop Wild Relatives and Wild Utilized Plants

Crop wild relatives—the plant species closely related to agricultural crops—are valuable
genetic resources used by plant breeders to increase pest and disease resistance, stress

Resource
8/20/19
Outreach Tools to Speak Out for Plants and Science

Contact your elected representatives and let them know how you feel about plants, our web of life, and the ecosystem services we all depend upon:

Resource
5/13/19
Indigenous knowledge networks in the face of global change

Indigenous communities rely extensively on plants for food, shelter, and medicine. It is still unknown, however, to what degree their survival is jeopardized by the loss of either plant species or

Resource
5/7/19
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge

This presentation reveals how gardens efforts have helped surpass the goals of the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge! 

Highlights:

Resource
3/13/19
Urban Cemeteries as Public Gardens

Mount Auburn, Laurel Hill, and Green-Wood, all established in the 1830s in Boston, Philadelphia, and Brooklyn respectively, were the first three “rural cemeteries” in the nation.

Resource
7/9/17
Public Gardens as Sensible Beacons of Plant Invasion

Invasive plant species can grow in natural areas even as they are commercially available throughout that region.

Resource
9/24/16