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Featured Resource

New Ideas for Moving Place-Based Learning Online

Watch this webinar in our series of looking at how we can move place-based education online, given the impact of COVID-19.

Resource
10/27/20
Inclusivity in Cooperative Extension Programming, With an Emphasis on Natural Resources and Climate Change

Through a case study from Washington, DC, participants will learn how to get feedback from historically underrepresented groups and tailor cooperative extension programs to people of different races, ages, and academic backgrounds.

Resource
10/27/20
Native Plant Materials Use and Commercial Availability in the Eastern United States

In 2018, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Seed Bank (MARSB) and the University of Maryland
Extension conducted an internet survey of the native plant and seed user community throughout

Resource
10/21/20
Resource
10/21/20
BHS: Flu Season and the COVID-19 Pandemic

The Fall and Winter seasons signal many beautiful changes in the Garden landscape; from colorful leaves to Holiday Lights.

Resource
10/14/20
Lessons Learned: A New Kind of Rose Garden

Available to Members only.

Resource
10/12/20
Behind The Scenes: 2020 Annual Conference

Pivoting from in-person to virtual events is never easy, especially when a pandemic is the root cause of the shift.

Resource
10/12/20
The state of the world’s urban ecosystems: What can we learn from trees, fungi, and bees?

Positive interactions between people and nature inspire behaviours that are in harmony
with biodiversity conservation and also afford physical and mental health benefits.

Resource
10/9/20
Plant and fungal collections: Current status, future perspectives

Plant and fungal specimens provide the auditable evidence that a particular organism
occurred at a particular place, and at a particular point in time, verifying past occurrence

Resource
10/9/20
Plant awareness disparity: A case for renaming plant blindness

“Plant blindness” is the cause of several problems that have plagued botany outreach
and education for over a hundred years. The general public largely does not notice

Resource
10/9/20

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