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Re-Oaking Silicon Valley: Building Vibrant Cities with Nature

In this report, we investigate how integrating components of oak woodlands into developed landscapes — “re-oaking” — can provide an array of valuable functions for both wildlife and people. Re-oaking can increase the biodiversity and ecological...

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10/9/18
Documenting Living Collections: A Study of Curatorial Practices, Challenges, and Solutions for Historic Botanic Gardens

Botanic gardens are living museums, offering opportunities for conservation and research as well as education, experience, and enjoyment through their plant collections. A garden’s plant records system is as vital as the plants themselves, and serves...

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3/16/18
Selecting and Maintaining Genetic Diversity

The Great Basin-Native Plant Project and Fire Science Exchange, the BLM Plant Conservation Program, the US Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station, and the Society for Ecological Restoration Great Basin Chapter provided this webinar series on...

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2/1/18
Harvesting Native Seed to Supply Landscape-Scale Restoration: Evaluating Risks and Sustainable Practices

Presenter: Justin Meissen, Research and Restoration Program Manager, University of Northern Iowa, Tallgrass Prairie Center

Seed supply limits large-scale restorations, which often rely on seed collection from remnant ecosystems. Overharvesting...

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1/30/18
Matching Appropriate Seed to Conservation Practices

Learn about ecotypes and ecological restoration planning tools for greater long term conservation planting success. This webinar is presented...

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11/16/17
Historical Trees on Campus

Trees are integral to campuses of colleges and universities. Tree collections at many schools are used for teaching and help to define the sense of place that many scholars associate with learning and discovery. Old trees on campus property may predate...

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10/17/17
Urban Cemeteries as Public Gardens

Mount Auburn, Laurel Hill, and Green-Wood, all established in the 1830s in Boston, Philadelphia, and Brooklyn respectively, were the first three “rural cemeteries” in the nation. As we look to the future where climate change portends massive...

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7/9/17
Rediscovering a Lost Landscape: The Construction of a Piedmont Prairie

The vanishing landscape of the southeastern piedmont prairie is largely unknown to those living amongst the scattered remnants of this diverse but imperiled habitat. In 2014, staff at the Sarah P. Duke Gardens set out to design and construct a one-acre...

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7/9/17
Centennial Trees: Planting Locally Sourced Native Trees for Community Conservation Education

Centennial Trees is a nine-year-old outreach program of the Birmingham Botanical Gardens that educates the community on the importance of planting locally-sourced native tree seedlings in public spaces. Trees selected for the program are determined to...

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7/8/17
Preserving 20th Century Garden Design Excellence While Adapting as Resilient 21st Century Public Gardens

Today the leaders of public gardens are faced with many difficult decisions related to climate change, membership and audience development, change in historic character, and maintenance. Necessary contemporary...

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9/24/16
Western Botanical Gardens: History and Evolution

The history of botanical gardens, from ancient Egyptian and Roman roots, through medieval and Renaissance developments, and up to 21st century developments, is chronicled in a new article, ‘Western Botanical Gardens: History and Evolution’ by Donald A...

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1/25/16
Arnold Arboretum’s Landscape Management Plan

This edition (Spring 2011) of the Landscape Management Plan is the result of the continuing work of the Horticulture Department of the Arnold Arboretum. It is a detailed game plan that communicates the shared goals and priorities collectively developed...

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11/4/15

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