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Implementing Energy Efficiency through Sub-meters

Participants will learn how to begin sub-metering utilities on their campus and how this data can inform and justify not only the cost of the sub-meters, but of energy efficiency projects as well. Participants will also learn how we have taken this a step further by institutionalizing this data in a student-designed energy management information system. Both of these will serve as an example that participants can implement on their campus. 

A new pest: The spotted lanternfly

The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) is an invasive planthopper native to China, India and Vietnam.  It was first discovered in Pennsylvania and has spread to other counties in the eastern United States.  This insect has the potential to greatly impact agricultural crops such as grapes, hops, and hardwoods.  It is also reducing the quality of life for people living in heavily infested areas. Spotted lanternfly can be controlled with a combination of physical removal of life stages on host trees, as well as pesticide applications.

The Landscape Architect in the Nursery: Tagging Trees and Enforcing Specifications

Tree defects such as co-dominant leaders, girding roots and buried trunk flares, present at time of planting, cause failures and decline long after the warrantee period has expired.  Landscape architects may go to nurseries to tag trees; but often inspect only aesthetic qualities, while their planting specifications rely on ANSI Z60.1 for technical standards.  But the ANSI standard is guidance for industry definitions and measurements with few conditions about tree quality.  This webinar presented by James Urban, FASLA and Paul Josey, ASLA, introduced evidence-based specifications to set te

Can We Vaccinate Trees to Protect Against Diseases?

Tree diseases are controlled primarily by spray applications of fungicides. Increased legislative restrictions regarding the use and application of fungicides stimulated by a greater environmental awareness means new techniques of disease control are required. Induced resistance (IR) is the phenomenon whereby a plant’s own defense mechanisms are switched on by treatment with either a biological or chemical agent.

Vacant to Vibrant: How to Turn Vacant Lots into Vibrant Plots

Vacant lots in your neighborhood can illustrate neglect and seem like a waste of space. But, these open spaces can also serve as clean canvases for creative community projects that bring positive change. 

Interested in learning from leaders and thinkers who have transformed vacant places into vibrant green spaces? Hear from Sandra Albro, author of "Vacant to Vibrant: Creating Successful Green Infrastructure Networks", and project leaders who work with ioby (in our backyards) about how to turn ideas for transforming vacant lots into reality. 

Climate Action Planning Webinar

Climate Action Planning is designed to help planners, municipal staff and officials, citizens and others working at local levels to develop and implement plans to mitigate a community’s greenhouse gas emissions and increase the resilience of communities against climate change impacts. This fully revised and expanded edition goes well beyond climate action plans to examine the mix of policy and planning instruments available to every community. Boswell, Greve, and Seale also look at process and communication: How does a community bring diverse voices to the table?

Green Infrastructure: A Triple Bottom Line Approach to Environmental Justice

The guiding principle of environmental justice is that all people, regardless of race, color, national origin, or income are entitled to equal protection from environmental risks. Across the United States, a variety of socioeconomic metrics are used to identify communities with environmental justice needs, but all of these communities have one thing in common: populations that suffer a disproportionate share of the negative environmental consequences resulting from industrial, governmental, and commercial operations or policies.

Quantifying Rainfall Interception in the Urban Canopy

Urban stormwater is a major contributor to surface water degradation in the United States, prompting cities to invest in green infrastructure - methods that naturally capture, store, and slowly release runoff, such as urban trees. While rainfall interception for full canopy environments is well studied, limited research is available that characterizes the interception of open-grown trees, which are commonly found in urban areas.

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