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2018 Horticulture, Greenhouses, Facilities Community Symposium - Program

From the Ground Up

Keeping Horticulture Alive through Grounds and Infrastructure Management

Horticulture, Greenhouses, & Facilities Community Symposium
October 9-12, 2018 | Tulsa, OK and Bentonville, AR
Hosted by: Tulsa Botanic Garden and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

PRE-SYMPOSIUM OFFER

Tuesday October 9, 2018

PRE-SYMPOSIUM OFFER - PHILBROOK MUSEUM
This is not an official Symposium event and transportation is not provided.

12-4 pm FREE ADMISSION to the Philbrook Museum of Art. Philbrook is typically closed on Tuesdays, but will be open for Symposium attendees.

2pm Tour of Philbrook led by Director of Horticulture Sheila Kanotz. 

SYMPOSIUM OPENS - TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

5:30 pm Buses will depart Fairfield Inn & Suites Tulsa Downtown for Tulsa Botanic Garden     

Opening Reception and Keynote: Horticulture in 2018 and Beyond

6:00 – 8:00 pm 
Dr. Richard T. Olsen, the Director of the USDA-ARS United States National Arboretum (USNA) in Washington, DC will reflect on the present state of horticulture and what he thinks the future may bring. Like many other industries, the field of horticulture is changing and attendees to this presentation will gain some new insights and perspectives for their work and careers. It is an exciting time to be in horticulture and Richard will provide inspiration for all.
Presenter: R. Olsen, Director, U.S. National Arboretum 

8:00 pm  Buses will return to Fairfield Inn & Suites Tulsa Downtown for on your own Dinner options

Wednesday October 10, 2018 

TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

8:00 am  Buses will depart Fairfield Inn & Suites Tulsa Downtown for Tulsa Botanic Garden. All attendees travelling to Bentonville must check out of hotel. Those taking the bus to Bentonville must have luggage loaded into the coach. We will depart for Bentonville directly from Tulsa Botanic Garden.

Hot Breakfast followed by Opening Remarks

8:15 am  
Breakfast is sponsored by Longwood Gardens.

PANEL TOPIC 1: GARDENS AT DIFFERENT AGES – INFRASTRUCTURE AND HORTICULTURAL CHALLENGES

Infrastructure Challenges of New Public Gardens
From Mid-Life to Old Age: Infrastructure Doesn't Always Age Well
Infrastructure Never Stops

8:45-10:00 am               
Location: J.E. and L.E. Mabee Grange                     
As public gardens age, there will be operational challenges that arise in the gardens and built elements that will need to be addressed in order to provide a high quality experience for visitors. This presentation will give participants an overview of how institutions of varying ages are strategically addressing some of these challenges and what the impacts are on day-to-day operations and budgets. Good planning will help reduce the number of maintenance surprises, even in a new garden.
This session has been approved for LA CES credit.
Presenters: T. Lasseigne, Tulsa Botanic Garden; C. Bakker, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art; A. Crossan, Longwood Gardens, Inc.; P. Grimaldi, Cheekwood Art and Gardens

RENEWING THE GARDEN

10:00-11:00 am  
Location: J.E. and L.E. Mabee Grange
Over time, garden designs and infrastructure need an update to improve appearance, update collections, and increase relevance to the public. The planning process for this revitalization typically involves the melding of different institutional department ideas and issues along with board involvement. Learn from Kelly Norris, Director of Horticulture and Education, on how the Greater Des Moines Botanical Garden planned and implemented the renovation, revitalization, and expansion of its gardens, taking it from municipal management to a public-private partnership.
This session has been approved for LA CES credit.
Presenter: K. Norris, Greater Des Moines Botanical Garden        

Coffee and Pastry Break

11:00-11:20      
coffee and pastries sponsored by Longwood Gardens

PLANT TRIALS AND DISPLAY HORTICULTURE

11:20-12:25 pm  
Location: J.E. and L.E. Mabee Grange
Display gardens represent examples of horticultural excellence for the public while also allowing gardens to try out new plants that may or may not perform.  This dichotomy creates an inherent challenge, in terms of having institutional horticultural standards align with the goals of plant trials.  In this session, attendees will learn how a trial garden set within the overall public garden can be used to test plants and provide a pipeline of new and interesting plants to include in the permanent collections. Jenny Wegley, Vice President of Horticulture Operations at Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden, will enlighten us on the extensive work done over decades to trial plants and educate both the public and green industry professionals on plants that thrive in the tough climate of north Texas, while at the same time creating a beautiful and beloved space within their overall garden. 
Presenter: J. Wegley, Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden

LUNCH

12:20-1:30 pm

PANEL TOPIC 2: DISASTERS AT PUBLIC GARDENS
The Public Relations Side of Disasters
The Feral Hog Problem in Oklahoma
Oklahoma's Climate

1:30-2:45 pm  
Location: J.E. and L.E. Mabee Grange
Everyone knows the immediate impact of a disaster, natural or otherwise – downed trees, power outages, water shortages, etc. on any community.  In the weeks after a disaster reduced attendance, negative publicity, cancelled programs, and general loss of revenue hits hard.  But the impacts beyond the immediate are just as important.  As public gardens, and reservoirs of plant germplasm, plant records, research and evaluation programs, any disaster can have lasting impacts unseen by the general public, especially when disaster recovery overwhelms the larger community.  Our obligation to prepare and safeguard against such disasters has become even more pressing as climate change and public funding changes.  Representatives from three gardens will share their perspective on how they prepared (or didn’t), what happened, what they did, and what they wish they had done and share ideas on how we can all lessen the negative impacts of disasters.
Presenter: D. Flanders, Atlanta Botanical Garden, G McManus, Okalahoma State Climatologist, S.Alls, USDA APHIS Wildlife Services


PANEL TOPIC 3: EMERGING PESTS
Rose Rosette Disease and Crape Myrtle Bark Scale
Pine Wilt Syndrome
Sentinel Plant Network: Pests Galore!
Laurel Wilt Syndrome and Other Exciting New Pests

2:45-4:30 pm  
Location: J.E. and L.E. Mabee Grange
We live in an ever changing world, and that certainly goes for the pest world too.  Previous barriers and buffers are no more.  A pest that would have taken years to march across our continent and through our gardens now spreads at shocking speeds.  Increased public attention on chemical use and pest control methods requires a much more delicate approach to managing these pests especially since public gardens are viewed as an educational resource for the green industry and homeowners.  The best line of defense is knowledge – identification, life cycle, path of introduction, and management options.  Speakers from public gardens and universities will present both an overview and in-depth reviews of upcoming new pests and their management so that we can all be on the watch for the next ‘star’ of the pest world.
Presenters: T. Hale, American Public Gardens Association;  B. Jervis, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension, J. Griffin, Kansas State University; A. Black, Peckerwood Garden

TOUR OF TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN WITH FOOD AND BEVERAGE STATIONS

4:30-5:30 pm  

Buses depart Tulsa Botanic Garden

6:00-8:00 pm  
Arrival at Best Western Plus Castlerock Inn & Suite, Bentonville, AR - refreshments provided en route.
Late evening dinner suggestions will be made upon arrival.

Thursday October 11, 2018

CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

8:00 am  Buses will depart Best Western Plus Castlerock Inn & Suite for Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
Breakfast available prior to departure at the hotel.

OPENING REMARKS

8:30 am  
Location: Great Hall


INVESTING IN FUTURE GENERATIONS: HOW NATIVE PLANT EDUCATION PROGRAMS ASSIST FUTURE GARDENERS

9:05-10:05 am
Location: Great Hall                      
How we garden and educate today affects not only future generations of fauna and flora, but also future generations of gardeners.  In this session, attendees will hear how two different institutions educate on the history, cultivation, and importance of indigenous plant species to audiences.  John T. Manion will discuss the popular Certificate of Native Plant Studies that has served over 2,000 participants since he started the program in 2011.  Scott Woodbury will discuss the different continuing education programs that Shaw Nature Reserve offers: the Native Plant School and the Shaw Professional Landscape Series, each program marketed to different audiences.  Session attendees will learn the process of establishing and maintaining native plant-based educational programs as well as the benefits the programs have had on their institutions and communities.    
Presenters: J. Manion, Birmingham Botanical Gardens; S. Woodbury, Shaw Nature Reserve

DESIGNED PLANT COMMUNITIES: A FRESH APPROACH TO DESIGNING AND MANAGING PUBLIC GARDENS

10:10-11:10 am  
Location: Great Hall 
The world of landscape design is undergoing an exciting and significant shift in its approach to our landscaped spaces—moving from traditional command-and-control practices to a style informed by nature. Designed plant communities represent the pinnacle of ecologically-inspired landscape design. Such landscapes combine the ecological vibrancy, resiliency, plasticity, and function of natural systems with the creation of intimate, highly designed, and desirable spaces. The conception and management of designed plant communities require the bringing together of certain aspects of traditional horticulture with a knowledge of local natural history and ecology, an approach often uncomfortable for the more traditional gardener or landscape designer. In this session, we will discuss the unique characteristics of designed plant communities and best practices for their management and care. Examples will be drawn from Lurie Garden and Millennium Park in Chicago, Illinois, as well as other similar landscapes throughout the United States.
This session has been approved for LA CES credit.
Presenter: S. Stewart, Millennium Park Foundation

11:15-11:30 am     BREAK

FACILITIES PANEL DISCUSSION

11:30-12:30 pm  
Location: Great Hall 
"Sounds good, but what about the parking?" In public spaces one background issue seems to consistently affect the well-being of your guest experience before they ever get to the door....Parking. Elspeth Nelson, Director of Facility Operations at The Dallas Arboretum, will chronicle the challenges, considerations, goals and outcomes of tackling this issue in a modern urban setting. Susan L.B. Jacobson, Manager of Planning and Site Design at The Morton Arboretum, will share the successes and challenges of creating an environmentally sensitive solution while balancing parking demand with land constraints. In this discussion you will learn about a permeable pavement parking lot that is performing in a northern climate with minimal maintenance.
Presenter: S. Jacobson, Morton Arboretum; E. Nelson, Dallas Arboretum

LUNCH WITH "LESSONS LEARNED" TABLE ACTIVITY

12:35-1:35 pm   
Location: Great Hall 

FIRE RX!

1:45-3:00 pm
Location:    
Just what the doctor ordered....Prescribed Fire!!?? Intentionally setting your property on fire may not seem like a good idea. As it turns out you may find it to be the most natural choice you can make for your garden. McCree Andersen and Doug Zollner of The Nature Conservancy will guide us through the ecological and safety benefits, environmental considerations and various techniques for using fire in your gardens, arboretums, and meadows.
Presenters: M. Anderson, D. Zollner, The Nature Conservancy


FROM THE GROUND UP PANEL DISCUSSION

3:00-4:15 pm 
Location: Great Hall
From the Ground Up, Indeed! Organics in the Modern Public Garden. From building soils from scratch to keeping up with SITES requirements to building and maintaining your own beneficial insectarium to the world of growing organically is vast and challenging. The panelists will share their trails, successes and passion for growing and maintaining the garden as naturally as possible. 
Presenters: T. Tiddens, Chicago Botanic Garden; C. Welles, Lotusland; J. Horenstein, Phipps Conservatory

4:15-4:30 pm        BREAK

TOUR: ART. ARCHITECTURE. NATURE.

4:30-6:00 pm  

DINNER RECEPTION AND SYMPOSIUM CONCLUDES

6:00-8:00 pm  
Dinner will be served on the Frank Lloyd Wright lawn with master storyteller Timothy Totten

8:00 pm  Buses will depart Crystal Bridge Museum of American Art for Best Western Plus Castlerock Inn & Suite

Friday October 12, 2018

7:30 am  Bus will depart Best Western Plus Castlerock Inn & Suite for OPTIONAL SHUTTLE to Tulsa International Airport 

For those who wish to depart directly from Arkansas: Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport is located 10.2 miles from Best Western Plus Castlerock Inn & Suite. 
Transportation is not provided to Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport.