People and Gardens

July 2014

 

Tilia Collection at The Morton Arboretum achieves NAPCC Accreditation

APGA is pleased to announce that The Morton Arboretum has been awarded NAPCC accreditation for its Tilia (linden) Collection. The Arboretum has developed this comprehensive taxonomic collection of lindens for over 70 years. It comprises 46 taxa, 118 accessions, and 226 plants. The collection focuses on documented, wild-collected germplasm as well as selected cultivars and hybrids. The scope and depth of the collection contributes to ex-situ conservation, and serves as a reference collection for researchers, green industry professionals, and tree breeders. It represents the Arboretum’s sixth NAPCC collection.

 

Find more information here:  http://www.publicgardens.org/napcc

 

 


 

Gilles Vincent, Chenshan Botanical Garden, presented the Insignia of the Ordre National du Québec

Gilles Vincent, Special Advisor of the Executive President at the Chenshan Botanical Garden, was recently presented the Insignia of the Ordre National du Québec by Premier Philippe Couillard. The Ordre National du Québec is the highest civilian honor of distinction for the Canadian province of Quebec. Vincent recently retired as Director of the Montreal Botanical Garden after an extraordinary thirty year career.

 

Read more here.
 


 

Céline Arseneault, Montreal Botanical Garden, selected as the 2014 recipient of the Charles Robert Long Award of Extraordinary Merit

Céline Arseneault, Botanist and Librarian at the Montreal Botanical Garden, was recently “selected as the 2014 recipient of the Charles Robert Long Award of Extraordinary Merit. This is the highest honor presented by Council on Botanical and Horticultural Libraries (CBHL) and was established to recognize outstanding service to CBHL and/or the field of botanical and horticultural literature, information services and research. This award recognizes Céline's significant contributions to not only CBHL, but also the Montréal Botanical Garden, and beyond.”

 

Read more here.

 

 


 

​Julian Duval, San Diego Botanic Garden, receives Horticulturalist of the Year Award

Julian Duval, President and CEO of the San Diego Botanic Garden recently received the Horticulturalist of the Year Award from the San Diego Horticultural Society at the Flower and Garden Show at the Del Mar Fairgrounds.  He describes his two decades at the Garden, including the opening of the popular Hamilton Children’s Garden five years ago, as one of the highlights of his career.

“The San Diego Botanic Garden truly is a special place to be a part of. I feel very fortunate that I have had the opportunity to work with so many talented staff members, donors, benefactors and volunteers over the years, all of whom have helped to make my job a success,” said Julian.

For more information, visit www.sandiegobotanicgarden.org.
 



Paul W. Meyer, Morris Arboretum, receives prestigious Liberty Hyde Bailey Award 

Paul W. Meyer, the F. Otto Haas Executive Director of the Morris Arboretum, received the prestigious Liberty Hyde Bailey Award from the American Horticultural Society (AHS) at its June 5th Great American Gardeners Awards Ceremony at River Farm in Alexandria, Virginia.  AHS presents the Liberty Hyde Bailey Award to an individual who has made significant lifetime contributions to a least three of the following horticultural fields: teaching, research, communications, plant exploration, administration, art, business, and leadership. 

 “This recognition would not be possible without the help of a dedicated Board, hardworking staff and volunteers, and all of the Arboretum’s generous supporters." Meyer was quick to add when congratulated for this prestigious award. “This is an affirmation of the national and international impact of the Morris Arboretum”, he continued.

 For more information, visit www.morrisarboretum.org
 



Greater Des Moines Botanical Garden makes the New York Times

The Greater Des Moines Botanical Garden was recently featured in the New York Times highlighting its upcoming civic project, the efforts to close the dogwood gap, and some unexpected key players involved in the process:

“Specifically, the civic project is the development of 14 riverfront acres at the Greater Des Moines Botanical Garden. Until recently, this operation amounted to a geodesic dome with a big fig tree and leaky Plexiglas panels. Now, having ripped up a frontage road and graded a grass lot, contractors will spend the summer constructing a water element, a maple tree allée, a pine-and-gravel garden, a perennial display and a belvedere. There will be shrubs.

Even more unconventional may be the choice of custodians for this new downtown landmark. That is, a 27-year-old and three of his college chums.”

The entire New York Times article can be viewed here:  http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/26/garden/botanys-new-boys.html?_r=2
 



Unusual flowering plant at the University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley

The University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley is featuring a flowering plant of the Queen of the Andes (Puya raimondii). It is producing a giant inflorescence that could reach 30 feet high and feature up to 30,000 flowers. Plants in the wild are generally 80 to 100 years old before they flower. The 24-year-old plant was grown from seed collected in Bolivia in 1990 by Jim Luteyn and Larry Dorr, then with the New York Botanical Garden. This particular plant is younger than the 28-year-old one that bloomed in the UC Botanical Garden in 1986, which was probably the first ever in a botanical garden.

 

Updates are posted on the Garden’s web site: http://botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu/whatsnew/Puya2014/index.shtml
 

 


 

Barnes Foundation Arboretum opens to the public

Beginning in May, the Arboretum of the Barnes Foundation will be open for public visitation Fridays through Sundays, 10 am to 4 pm.

“We are pleased to be able to open the Arboretum to the public on weekends over the summer,” said Margaret Zminda, Interim Director of the Barnes Foundation. “The gardens are beautiful and there are many historic and rare plants to see.”

While Dr. Barnes concentrated on building and refining the Foundation’s art collection, Laura Barnes devoted herself to developing the Arboretum for more than 40 years. Her legacy lives on in rolling lawns surrounded by rare specimen trees from around the world, mature woodlands, a teahouse overlooking a pond, formal gardens, and in the Arboretum School that she founded in 1940.
 

For more information, visit the online Press Office: http://press.barnesfoundation.org.  For tickets or tours, go to www.barnesfoundation.org/visit or call 215 278 7200.