People and Gardens

December 2013

 
YOUtopia Garden in Action: Royal Botanical Gardens
 
This month’s featured YOUtopia member, Royal Botanical Gardens, is in the midst of Project Paradise, the largest restoration project of its kind in North America. An innovative freshwater marsh restoration venture, Project Paradise is dependent on the Fishway, the first two-way/carp barrier structure on the Great Lakes. The project is committed to addressing the major marsh stressors that led to the decline of area wetlands. Royal Botanical Gardens scientists expect that by eliminating the stressors, the marsh will naturally regenerate and become self-sustaining. The long term goal is to create the underlying conditions for ecosystem recovery, while in the short term manage the non-native carp that dominated and destroyed the wetlands. Key restoration species are cattails (Typha sp.), white water lily (Nymphaea sp.) wild rice (Zizania sp.), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens). 
 

 

 
Lagerstroemia Collection at Norfolk Botanical Garden Achieves NAPCC Accreditation
 
APGA is pleased to announce that Norfolk Botanical Garden has been awarded NAPCC accreditation for its extensive Lagerstroemia (crepe myrtles) collection of 237 specimens representing 75 taxa. The collection was started by Fred Heutte, the first director of the garden, who considered crepe myrtles among his favorites. He planted many at the garden, and as street trees throughout Norfolk in his previous role as city parks supervisor. They thrive in the region’s warm humid summers and temperate winters, and provide spectacular displays of summer blooms followed by colorful fall foliage and ornamental bark. Adding images for all accessions in the collection is among the garden’s five-year goals. 
 
Plant records can now be accessed online, and are linked to their location in the garden: http://gardenexplorer.nbgs.org/
 
For more information about NAPCC, visit: http://www.publicgardens.org/napcc
 


New staff joins the Meadowlark Botanical Gardens team

Carol Miranda and Keely Shaughnessy have joined the Garden staff as full-time Horticulturists. Carol brings many years of experience and is an adjunct instructor at the Northern Virginia Community College Horticulture program. Carol has an interest in native plants, interior plants, and perennials. Keely is a graduate of the University of Delaware Plant Science program and completed a year-long internship at Longwood Gardens. Keely has particular expertise in greenhouse management and seed propagation.
 
 
(Excerpt pulled, with permission, from Meadowlark Botanical Gardens Fall 2013 Newsletter)
 
 
 
 


Morris Arboretum’s Director of Botany receives Environmental Award

The Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy presents awards annually to ensure that community efforts to protect and improve the local environment are publicly acknowledged. Since its inception as a public garden, the Morris Arboretum has served as a center for botanical research. With a focus on the occurrence of the native and naturalized plants that inhabit Pennsylvania, the botany department at the Morris Arboretum, led since 2000 by Director of Botany Dr. Timothy Block, recognizes the continued importance of understanding the dynamic nature of the flora, and seeks to gain insight into these changes through work in the field, laboratory, and at the computer.  
 
 
Photo caption: The Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy presented Dr. Timothy Block of Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania with the 2013 Advocate of the Watershed Environmental Award, recognizing outstanding contributions to the local environment.
 
 

 

Phipps Conservatory’s Center for Sustainable Landscapes earns four-star rating
 
Phipps Conservatory’s Center for Sustainable Landscapes is the first project to earn SITES certification at the four-star rating and among the first projects in the world to be certified under the Sustainable Sites Initiative™ 2009 Rating System. This achievement demonstrates an innovative and successful application of sustainable land design and development practices.
 
 The SITES program is a collaboration of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center of The University of Texas at Austin, and the United States Botanic Garden. The program was created to fill a critical need for developing guidelines and recognition of sustainable landscapes based on their planning, design, construction, and intended maintenance. 
 
 


Lauritzen Gardens receives 2013 Nebraska Preservation Award

Lauritzen Gardens was recently recognized as a recipient of the 2013 Nebraska Preservation Award at the 135th meeting and awards luncheon of the Nebraska State Historical Society in Lincoln, Nebraska. Lauritzen received the award for its efforts to save and restore the Storz gazebo. Restoring the gazebo to its glory days required extensive and careful restoration work, including a new metal roof, reconstruction of the original cupola, and abatement of the original lead-based paint. Missing features were reproduced using the highest quality material to guarantee maximum life, accurate period construction, and minimum maintenance. Restoration work was completed in the summer of 2012 by Tim and Karen Conn and Hempel Sheetmetal. Funding for the project was provided by the Douglas County Visitor Improvement Fund. The project was coordinated by Andrew Leick, Director of Buildings and Grounds at Lauritzen Gardens. 
 
 
 


Pine Hollow Arboretum awarded level 1 accreditation by Arbnet

Pine Hollow Arboretum in Slingerlands, N.Y. has been awarded a Level I Accreditation. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, the Arboretum is now recognized as an accredited arboretum in The Morton Register of Arboreta.
 
The Pine Hollow Arboretum is a 25-acre property that was founded in 1966 by John W. Abbuhl, M.D., who began the collection to maintain “trees in a natural environment” and “to allow the land to tell me what to do”. His collection has grown over the last 50 years and now consists of over 3,400 unique trees, shrubs, and other woody plants from around the world, some of which are rare and/or endangered.
 
Visit www.arbnet.org or www.pinehollowarboretum.org to learn more.