Education

Develop

Tuesday, May 21, 2013 (9:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.) Location: Vaquero C

Creating Restorative, Empowering Environments for Therapeutic Healing

Public gardens are uniquely positioned among cultural institutions to craft restorative and empowering environments, reaching out to populations with special needs. When gardens are prepared to provide an enhanced experience for people with disabilities, they earn loyalty and promote wellness in their communities. This session will help participants understand various disabilities and look beyond the enabling garden to see the entire landscape as a healing place. Presenters will discuss therapeutic gardens in other contexts and draw connections to evidence-based design, operations, and programming strategies for public gardens to engage these members of our communities. In a world where autism spectrum disorders, PTSD, and age-related disabilities are on the rise, nature can make a difference.  People with disabilities have spending power of $200 billion annually. Public gardens are ideally suited to meet the needs of these folks and earn their loyalty.
 
Presenters:  Nancy Chambers, Retired Director, Enid A. Haupt Glass Garden and Horticulture Programs, New York University Medical Center; Barbara Kreski, Director of Horticultural Therapy Services, Chicago Botanic Garden; Kara A. Roggenkamp, Associate, MTR Landscape Architects.
 
 

Tuesday, May 21, 2013 (1:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.) Location: Vaquero A

Educational Insights from Museums on Intergenerational Learning

Research suggests growing numbers of public garden visitors attend as intergenerational groups.  Join other educators in an interactive conversation about how to enhance visitor learning experiences by responding to recent research in the museum field related to visitor motivations, the unique needs of families, and participatory design of learning experiences. Heavy workloads often limit an educator’s ability to stay current in new learning research. This session will summarize lessons from new literature and facilitate the exchange of ideas between attendees to enhance intergenerational learning in all gardens, not just children’s gardens. Several educators from diverse gardens (in size and geography) will share their knowledge of working with intergenerational audiences to stimulate small-group discussion.
Literature referenced to include identity and the Museum Experience by John Falk, 2009; The Participatory Museum by Nina Simon, 2010; Museums and Families: being of value by Lynn Dierking, 2012; Creating Great visitor Experiences by Stephanie Weaver, 2008.
 
Presenters:  Mary Kay Cunningham, Interpretive Specialist, Dialogue Consulting; Emily Morris, Informal Science Education Coordinator, Desert Botanical Garden; Amy Hoffmann, Education Coordinator, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve.
 

Click here to view this presentation as a PDF.

 

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (8:15 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.) Location: Vaquero A

The Successful Evolution of Adult Education Programs: Meeting Changing Demands and Interests 

In order to continue to be relevant and successful, adult education programs must evolve to meet changing demographics, keeping the mission/goals of the organization in focus, and remaining financially viable.  Hear from four organizations that have effectively attacked this head-on.  Many gardens have seen a drop in participation in traditional programs, even though many have been offered successfully for years.  At the same time, many organizations are looking for diverse streams of revenue, and taking a closer look at the finances of their educational programs. We must not rely only on our  traditional, older audience and established programming, but reach out to young adults whose interests tend to be very different. This presentation will focus on how adult fee-based programming has changed at Phipps; The botanic Garden of Smith College’s move to more integrative and interdisciplinary programming, which reaches people who are not necessarily looking for an educational experience; as well as budgetary and 
pricing considerations, including price points.
 
Presenters: Margie Radebaugh, Director of Horticulture and Education at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens; Gabe Tilove, Adult Education Coordinator, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens; Madelaine Zadik, Manager of Education and Outreach, The Botanic Garden of Smith College; Tina Wilson, Director of Education, Desert Botanical Garden; Jan Little, Director of Education and Public Programs, Sarah P. Duke Gardens.
 
 

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.) Location: Vaquero A

Education Mini Series:

Evolving a Botany Research Program: Connecting PhD Students’ Research to the Lives of the Public 

Amazing discoveries are made, published in scientific journals, and read by scientists. They rarely make it to the public; findings are sequestered in the scientific community. The updated Botany in Action (BIA) graduate fellowship program at Phipps Conservatory and botanical Gardens now breaks this pattern. The BIA program trains scientists to interpret science to a broad range of audiences. The program evolved from one that primarily provided a forum for giving standard scientific lectures to traditional audiences; bia now educates scientists and the public simultaneously. BIA helps scientists develop the skills to translate their research for a general audience through oral, visual, written, and multi-media modes.  In turn, BIA researchers work to put a new “face” on scientists, engaging with the public both in person at Phipps and online. Learn about BIA as a model program and gather tips for connecting and simultaneously educating scientists and the public.
 
Presenter: Amanda Joy, Science Education Specialist, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens.
 
 

Building Capacity Through Co-op Programs

Learn how to recruit new minds for cooperative learning experiences in your garden through strategic partnerships with high schools and colleges. Without adding new interest and youthful minds to the ranks of our staff, membership, and visitation, the public gardens of today will tire, age, and near extinction. Longwood Gardens recently launched a Co-op Program in partnership with a local technical high school and trade college. The program is strategically aimed to build capacity in public horticulture, not only through opportunities with plants and gardening, but through other trades including carpentry, machinery, electrical, hvaC, etc. it allows for hands-on training with knowledgeable staff coupled with academic learning in the students’ classroom at his/her home institution. The program has proven successful on several fronts: the student satisfies a mandatory experiential learning requirement, the school gains a community partner, and the public garden profession is impressed on future generations as a potential career path.
 
Presenters: Brian Trader, Coordinator of Domestic and International Studies, Longwood Gardens; Heidi Militana, Instructor for the Wildlife and Natural Resource Management Program, Chester County Technical College High School.
 

This presentation is not yet available.
 

University Arboreta: Curriculum, Research, and Institutional Image

Most university arboreta seem to be isolated from other campus entities, and many are in competition with physical plant departments or academic units. We need some unity in seeking help! Our struggles for internal support are many and difficult. This session provides an APGA-wide discussion forum for these issues to help us to present a stronger case to our administrators. how can student learning be increased? What kinds of research are appropriate in college arboreta? Why do visiting parents decide on colleges based on the perceived quality of the landscape?
 
Presenter: Martin Quigley, Kurtz Chair in Botany
 
 

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.) Location: Arizona VI

Full STEAM Ahead

Join the presentation and discussion with members of our STEM + art stakeholders and walk away with a new approach to program planning.  For many Gardens, developing and implementing STEM initiatives can be challenging when faced with changing educational standards, managing donor expectations, and convincing others that science goes beyond physics or chemistry. This session will address how the Desert botanical Garden is creating a sustainable STEM + art model to meet the changing needs of teachers and schools while supporting the Garden’s mission and creating unique learning experiences that 
keep environmental education programming relevant.  Participants will learn how environmental education and life sciences can be combined with their institution’s art exhibits to create unique learning experiences that address Common Core and next Generation standards while still creating opportunities for program funding.
 
Presenters: Tina Wilson, Director of Education, Desert Botanical Garden; Teniqua Broughton, Executive Director of the Act One Foundation; Wendy Cohen, Principal, Yavapai Elementary School; Cyndi Coon, Owner, Laboratory5 Inc.
 

 

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.) Location: Arizona VI

Education I:  Building Dynamic Intergenerational Volunteer Educator Communities

Engaging visitors with nature.  Educators and visionary administrators will receive hard data on the benefits of intergenerational volunteer teaching structures. uS Census data indicate that in the coming decades our country will see great increases in the youngest (under eighteen) and the oldest (over 
sixty-five) citizens to nearly fifty percent of our total population. These populations represent the future of 
our institutions, offering unique skill sets as educators.  Do a teen and a retired textbook editor who trained together have a special advantage when helping first graders test how plants disperse seeds? This presentation will ask participants to take a revolutionary look at the structure of their programs and examine the benefits of engaging volunteers of many ages and backgrounds in becoming exceptional educators within a shared learning environment. Participants will learn behind the scenes training methods while sharing in a dialogue about best practices.
 
Presenters: Jeffrey Downing, Executive Director, Mt. Cuba Center; Susan L. Wagner, Vice President of Education and Information, The Morton Arboretum; Sarah Paulson, Assistant Manager of The Everett Children’s Adventure Garden at The New York Botanical Garden.
 
This presentation is not available.
 

Education II: Preparing Elementary Teachers in Science: a GardenZoo-University Model Location: Arizona VII

This project provides a demonstration of one way in which a partnership between ISIS and higher education institution(s) can be formed.  Informal Science Institutions (ISIS) represent a tremendous resource for teacher education. however, few ISIS provide programs for pre-service teachers, and the effectiveness of these programs has not been extensively documented or broadly disseminated.  Funded by the US Department of Education Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), The New York botanical Garden, in partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society, and The City University of New York’s Lehman College School of Education, created outside-the-box to study the efficacy of collaborations between iSis and universities in the preparation of pre-service elementary teachers. This three-year program introduces the pre-service participants to science, science education practices, and the use of outdoor settings for inquiry science investigation across disciplines. Participants will learn how the outside-the-box program works to help prepare pre-service elementary teachers in collaboration with their formal graduate studies.  Participants will also learn how to replicate elements of the outside-the-box Program through partnerships involving other science institutions and universities.
 
Presenters:  Judith Hutton, Manager of Teacher Professional Development, The New York Botanical Garden; Amanda Lindell, Coordinator of Professional Development, Wildlife Conservation Society.
 

Click here to view this presentation as a PDF.

 

 

Tuesday, May 21, 2013 (9:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.)
 
Creating Restorative, Empowering Environments for Therapeutic Healing
 
Public gardens are uniquely positioned among cultural institutions to craft restorative and empowering environments, reaching out to populations with special needs. When gardens are prepared to provide an enhanced experience for people with disabilities, they earn loyalty and promote wellness in their communities. This session will help participants understand various disabilities and look beyond the enabling garden to see the entire landscape as a healing place. Presenters will discuss therapeutic gardens in other contexts and draw connections to evidence-based design, operations, and programming strategies for public gardens to engage these members of our communities. In a world where autism spectrum disorders, PTSD, and age-related disabilities are on the rise, nature can make a difference.  People with disabilities have spending power of $200 billion annually. Public gardens are ideally suited to meet the needs of these folks and earn their loyalty.
 
Presenters:  Nancy Chambers, Retired Director, Enid A. Haupt Glass Garden and Horticulture Programs, New York University Medical Center; Barbara Kreski, Director of Horticultural Therapy Services, Chicago Botanic Garden; Kara A. Roggenkamp, Associate, MTR Landscape Architects.
 
 
Tuesday, May 21, 2013 (1:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.)
 
Educational Insights from Museums on Intergenerational Learning
 
Research suggests growing numbers of public garden visitors attend as intergenerational groups.  Join other educators in an interactive conversation about how to enhance visitor learning experiences by responding to recent research in the museum field related to visitor motivations, the unique needs of families, and participatory design of learning experiences. Heavy workloads often limit an educator’s ability to stay current in new learning research. This session will summarize lessons from new literature and facilitate the exchange of ideas between attendees to enhance intergenerational learning in all gardens, not just children’s gardens. Several educators from diverse gardens (in size and geography) will share their knowledge of working with intergenerational audiences to stimulate small-group discussion.
Literature referenced to include identity and the Museum Experience by John Falk, 2009; The Participatory Museum by Nina Simon, 2010; Museums and Families: being of value by Lynn Dierking, 2012; Creating Great visitor Experiences by Stephanie Weaver, 2008.
 
Presenters:  Mary Kay Cunningham, Interpretive Specialist, Dialogue Consulting; Emily Morris, Informal Science Education Coordinator, Desert Botanical Garden; Amy Hoffmann, Education Coordinator, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve.
 
 
Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (8:15 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.)
 
The Successful Evolution of Adult Education Programs: Meeting Changing Demands and Interests 
 
In order to continue to be relevant and successful, adult education programs must evolve to meet changing demographics, keeping the mission/goals of the organization in focus, and remaining financially viable.  Hear from four organizations that have effectively attacked this head-on.  Many gardens have seen a drop in participation in traditional programs, even though many have been offered successfully for years.  At the same time, many organizations are looking for diverse streams of revenue, and taking a closer look at the finances of their educational programs. We must not rely only on our  traditional, older audience and established programming, but reach out to young adults whose interests tend to be very different. This presentation will focus on how adult fee-based programming has changed at Phipps; The botanic Garden of Smith College’s move to more integrative and interdisciplinary programming, which reaches people who are not necessarily looking for an educational experience; as well as budgetary and 
pricing considerations, including price points.
 
Presenters: Margie Radebaugh, Director of Horticulture and Education at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens; Gabe Tilove, Adult Education Coordinator, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens; Madelaine Zadik, Manager of Education and Outreach, The Botanic Garden of Smith College; Tina Wilson, Director of Education, Desert Botanical Garden; Jan Little, Director of Education and Public Programs, Sarah P. Duke Gardens.
 
 
Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.)
 
Education Mini Series
 
Evolving a Botany Research Program: Connecting PhD Students’ Research to the Lives of the Public 
 
Amazing discoveries are made, published in scientific journals, and read by scientists. They rarely make it to the public; findings are sequestered in the scientific community. The updated Botany in Action (BIA) graduate fellowship program at Phipps Conservatory and botanical Gardens now breaks this pattern. The BIA program trains scientists to interpret science to a broad range of audiences. The program evolved from one that primarily provided a forum for giving standard scientific lectures to traditional audiences; bia now educates scientists and the public simultaneously. BIA helps scientists develop the skills to translate their research for a general audience through oral, visual, written, and multi-media modes.  In turn, BIA researchers work to put a new “face” on scientists, engaging with the public both in person at Phipps and online. Learn about BIA as a model program and gather tips for connecting and simultaneously educating scientists and the public.
 
Presenter: Amanda Joy, Science Education Specialist, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens.
 
Building Capacity Through Co-op Programs
 
Learn how to recruit new minds for cooperative learning experiences in your garden through strategic partnerships with high schools and colleges. Without adding new interest and youthful minds to the ranks of our staff, membership, and visitation, the public gardens of today will tire, age, and near extinction. Longwood Gardens recently launched a Co-op Program in partnership with a local technical high school and trade college. The program is strategically aimed to build capacity in public horticulture, not only through opportunities with plants and gardening, but through other trades including carpentry, machinery, electrical, hvaC, etc. it allows for hands-on training with knowledgeable staff coupled with academic learning in the students’ classroom at his/her home institution. The program has proven successful on several fronts: the student satisfies a mandatory experiential learning requirement, the school gains a community partner, and the public garden profession is impressed on future generations as a potential career path.
 
Presenters: Brian Trader, Coordinator of Domestic and International Studies, Longwood Gardens; Heidi Militana, Instructor for the Wildlife and Natural Resource Management Program, Chester County Technical College High School.
 
 
University Arboreta: Curriculum, Research, and Institutional Image
 
Most university arboreta seem to be isolated from other campus entities, and many are in competition with physical plant departments or academic units. We need some unity in seeking help! Our struggles for internal support are many and difficult. This session provides an APGA-wide discussion forum for these issues to help us to present a stronger case to our administrators. how can student learning be increased? What kinds of research are appropriate in college arboreta? Why do visiting parents decide on colleges based on the perceived quality of the landscape?
 
Presenter: Martin Quigley, Kurtz Chair in Botany
 
 
Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.)
 
Full Steam Ahead
 
Join the presentation and discussion with members of our STEM + art stakeholders and walk away with a new approach to program planning.  For many Gardens, developing and implementing STEM initiatives can be challenging when faced with changing educational standards, managing donor expectations, and convincing others that science goes beyond physics or chemistry. This session will address how the Desert botanical Garden is creating a sustainable STEM + art model to meet the changing needs of teachers and schools while supporting the Garden’s mission and creating unique learning experiences that 
keep environmental education programming relevant.  Participants will learn how environmental education and life sciences can be combined with their institution’s art exhibits to create unique learning experiences that address Common Core and next Generation standards while still creating opportunities for program funding.
 
Presenters: Tina Wilson, Director of Education, Desert Botanical Garden; Teniqua Broughton, Executive Director of the Act One Foundation; Wendy Cohen, Principal, Yavapai Elementary School; Cyndi Coon, Owner, Laboratory5 Inc.
 
 
Wednesday, May 22, 2013 (2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.)
 
Education I:  Building Dynamic Intergenerational Volunteer Educator Communities
 
Engaging visitors with nature.  Educators and visionary administrators will receive hard data on the benefits of intergenerational volunteer teaching structures. uS Census data indicate that in the coming decades our country will see great increases in the youngest (under eighteen) and the oldest (over 
sixty-five) citizens to nearly fifty percent of our total population. These populations represent the future of 
our institutions, offering unique skill sets as educators.  Do a teen and a retired textbook editor who trained together have a special advantage when helping first graders test how plants disperse seeds? This presentation will ask participants to take a revolutionary look at the structure of their programs and examine the benefits of engaging volunteers of many ages and backgrounds in becoming exceptional educators within a shared learning environment. Participants will learn behind the scenes training methods while sharing in a dialogue about best practices.
 
Presenters: Jeffrey Downing, Executive Director, Mt. Cuba Center; Susan L. Wagner, Vice President of Education and Information, The Morton Arboretum; Sarah Paulson, Assistant Manager of The Everett Children’s Adventure Garden at The New York Botanical Garden.
 
Education II: Preparing Elementary Teachers in Science: a GardenZoo-University Model
 
This project provides a demonstration of one way in which a partnership between ISIS and higher education institution(s) can be formed.  Informal Science Institutions (ISIS) represent a tremendous resource for teacher education. however, few ISIS provide programs for pre-service teachers, and the effectiveness of these programs has not been extensively documented or broadly disseminated.  Funded by the US Department of Education Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), The New York botanical Garden, in partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society, and The City University of New York’s Lehman College School of Education, created outside-the-box to study the efficacy of collaborations between iSis and universities in the preparation of pre-service elementary teachers. This three-year program introduces the pre-service participants to science, science education practices, and the use of outdoor settings for inquiry science investigation across disciplines. Participants will learn how the outside-the-box program works to help prepare pre-service elementary teachers in collaboration with their formal graduate studies.  Participants will also learn how to replicate elements of the outside-the-box Program through partnerships involving other science institutions and universities.
 
Presenters:  Judith Hutton, Manager of Teacher Professional Development, The New York Botanical Garden; Amanda Lindell, Coordinator of Professional Development, Wildlife Conservation Society.